-
hero-az1

Tools and Forms

HOW DOES THE STATE OF GEORGIA DEFINE A SMALL BUSINESS?

Georgia defines a small business as one which is independently owned and operated and must have either fewer than 300 employees or less than $30 million in gross receipts per year. Here are links to the most common tools and helpful business forms for which any sized business needs to be aware. The planning tools help guide you step by step on what you need to know before starting a business.

PLANNING TOOLS

To start or not to start – am I ready to start my own businesses? Research the start-up basics and take a self-assessing survey to determine if you are ready and find other helpful resources. Read the frequently asked questions about starting a business.

FORMS AND APPLICATIONS

LICENSING
Every business needs an operating license, which is obtained from the county or city in which the business resides. Please contact your local business licensing office which is generally housed within city hall. Does my business need a professional license? Licensing is an issue where other state and federal agencies come into play – for instance, day-care centers, USDA for certain food issues, etc. It will depend on the specific business.
REGISTERING YOUR BUSINESS 
You do not have to register your business with the state of Georgia unless you are planning to incorporate, become a specific legal entity or if you plan to do business with the state, in which case you will need to become a registered vendor.
LEGAL STRUCTURE
What legal structure should I choose? The Secretary of State website provides aid in the process of forming a business entity.
TRADE NAME FILING
Individuals or entities doing business under a name different from the owner(s) full legal name(s) must complete a Trade Name Filing with the Clerk of Superior Court in the county where the business is principally located. If you incorporate your business with the Secretary of State, registering a corporate name does not control the use of fictitious or trade names, and issuance of a corporate name does not affect the commercial availability of the name.
TAX INFORMATION
LABOR LAWS
What every employer should know. How businesses can start a retirement plan; choose the best plan for their particular circumstances and maintain them to keep in compliance with federal laws.
PERMITTING
Most permitting activity is going to involve local government agencies – building, zoning, occupancy, etc. Find your county’s key contacts for more about permits. There may be occasional environmental issues that would involve the Department of Natural Resources.
Mary Ellen McClanahan

Mary Ellen McClanahan

Director

404-962-4820

More About Georgia Benefits

Georgia’s industry-specific Project Analysts are available to help you with a wide range of business needs:

  • Site and building services
  • Location data
  • Community contacts and facilitation
  • Cost environment analysis
  • Coordination with state agencies

Fortune Favors the Peach